galton
I want Everything_ Anna Bartow
giulia
warner
aelst

Good Enough to Eat

These artists were obviously never told by their Mum’s not to play with their food.  And we’re certainly glad they weren’t…

1. BETH GALTON
Beth’s series ‘Cut Food’ is inspired by moving past the ‘aesthetic façade’ of food to uncover its interior realm. Her works are created either naturally, by cutting the food straight in half with very little manipulation or by using various food styling tricks (such as gelatin) to achieve the required results. Her work has been praised for turning the mundane into something truly captivating.

2. ANNA BARLOW
Anna’s works look like something Marie Antoinette would definitely approve of. Taking the ‘more is more’ approach, these delicate, decadent creations are made from ceramics. Her inspiration comes from ‘the way we eat food, especially by the rituals around celebrational or indulgent treats that have developed; the way they are assembled, displayed and then eaten.’ Now, if only these existed in real-life…

3. GIULIA BERNADELLI
This Italian artist gained notoriety after sharing her works of art through Instagram. Although she does experiment with different mediums, the majority of her works are created using the so-called ‘mess’ of spilt coffee. We love her intricate drawings and can’t wait to see more from her (just as long as she stays far away from our cup of caffeine!).

4.CARL WARNER
Former advertising photographer Carl Warner’s works are like something out of a storybook. His whimsical, fantastical scenes are created with real food using a layered photography technique. Of his works he says, “I tend to draw a very conventional landscape using classic compositional techniques as I need to fool the viewer into thinking it is a real scene at first glance, it is the realisation that the scene is in fact made of food that brings a smile that brings a smile to the viewer, and for me that’s the best part.”

5.KEVIN VAN AELST
Kevin uses common artifacts and food (such as the humble apple) and rearranges or reassembles them into various patterns or illustrations. He says that his work ‘is about creating order where we expect to find randomness, and also hints that the minutiae all around us is capable of communicating much larger ideas.’

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